How to win a Fulbright Scholarship (A.K.A How to score a fully funded, employer approved adventure to study whatever you want where ever you choose.)

The world is your oyster

The world is your oyster

Most people think that you need to be a 4.0 student to get a Fulbright. Not true.  You don’t even have to be a student!  (I was neither.)  You just need to be passionate enough about 1) researching your cause and 2) being an ambassador for America to convince the Fulbright committee that 1) you are worth funding and 2) will make good use of your time abroad. In hopes of encouraging a more diverse group of people to apply, I offer up my top 10 tips for potential applicants. I only have a sample size of one, so take them with a grain of salt.

1) Pick a topic of great interest to both the US and Host governments.

-Grant writing 101: You are asking these governments for money. Pick something that they care about.

-I chose “The effect of Globalization on the Italian Textile and Fashion Industries.” Italy’s family textile businesses are getting decimated by low-cost, Asian imports. The Italian government wants to know how to make those businesses more competitive. Guess who else is worried about low-cost, Asian imports? You got it, Uncle Sam.

2) Pick a relevant and timely topic.

-It’s better work on something new and exciting than to pick a topic that’s been beaten to death.

-“Globalization” was about as hot as it gets in 2006. Another girl in my class studied “the Slow Food Movement.” The Italian Fulbright committee was basically asking for her autograph.

3) Pick a topic that is personally relevant.

-You need to convince the admissions committee that you are PASSIONATE about whatever it is you propose to study, be it textiles or sea snails. Since there are no deliverables attached to the funding, the committee needs to know that you are going to follow through on your work.

-I talked about seeing Italian textiles manufactured first hand by a family business while I studied abroad in Siena back in college. I also showed my commitment to the garment industry by working an internship at Dolce & Gabbana.

4) Pick a topic that leverages your unique skills.

-Are the skills you have particularly relevant for the task on which you propose to work? They should be.

-I studied industrial and competitive dynamics 80hrs a week for two years straight on Wall Street.

5) Bring skills that aren’t available in the host country.

-Similar to #4, except that not only are you qualified for the job at hand, no one else in the host country can tackle the problem.

-Italy doesn’t have a crazy culture of excessive work, so there are very few people there that have spent 80hrs a week trying to understand why some companies succeed and others fail.

6) Bring back unique skills that benefit the US.

-Uncle Sam is footing at least half the bill for you trip, so make sure he is getting something out of the deal (in addition to all of the good will you are going to create!)

-As mentioned in #1, I brought back a better understanding of how small and medium sized businesses can compete with low cost foreign competition. I’m putting it into practice right now by starting my own business.

7) Secure as many solid affiliations as possible.

-Nine months is NOT a lot of time to produce anything meaningful, especially when you are air dropped into a foreign culture/language you may know nothing about and may not function “efficiently” in the first place. Fulbright wants to know what you are going to hit the ground running. To do so you are going to need some support/infrastructure.

-Most people have some connections from their current university or with their professors from study abroad. I didn’t have either so I just cold emailed over 75 professors at business schools all over Italy. I included examples of my work and offered to work on their projects for free. I ended up with my own office (and wonderful secretary) in the best business school in the country.

8) Use every possible question, no matter how small, to convey the value you will bring. Every word counts.

-This is obvious.

-I think I wrote entire paragraphs in one line spaces.

9) Read everything on the website and talk to past grantees.

-You can learn a lot by looking at who has gotten grants for what in the past. Talking to past grantees will give you an idea of what to expect.

-I definitely got help from my buddy who was a Fulbright.

10) Stick it out.

-The application process can be boring and tedious and easy to blow off. Don’t blow it off. It’s worth it. You’ll thank me later. I promise.

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14 responses to “How to win a Fulbright Scholarship (A.K.A How to score a fully funded, employer approved adventure to study whatever you want where ever you choose.)

  1. don’t forget language requirements. i’d love to get a fulbright to do more work in pisco, peru where my research is currently based, but my spanish is sucks. :) certain countries (i think indonesia is an example) waive the language requirement, so there are ways to get around it.

  2. Pingback: How to win a Fulbright Scholarship (A.K.A How to score a fully … | italy news

  3. Hello Brett,

    I found your entry on this subject through a fulbright blog. I was wondering if I could ask you a question? Would love to hear back from you, this fulbright application is getting a bit daunting.

    Sincerely,
    Rebecca Morris

  4. I’m surprised there are only two comments up here – I’m personally trying for a research grant (and perhaps requesting that tuition be paid under a degree program while there) in Poland this year. I will definitely take your advice! Though I would love to speak to the person that wrote this and ask them a few more questions about things.

    My wordpress account is up here – it’ll be my future travel blog as well, so if it’s possible to speak to the author of this, feel free to message me! Thanks again for all the great advice!

    • Hi Rebecca and mmshadows,

      I’m sorry, as you can see, i don’t really blog that much. I know it’s getting down to the wire but if you are still applying for the Fulbright, i’m more than happy to chat about it. brettlucasmartin AT gmail DOT com

      Best,
      Brett

  5. Awesome! thanks for the great advice. I will definitely be playing these angles while applying for a fulbright in new zealand! Double bookmarked!

  6. Hey Brett, I’m actually applying for a Fulbright, but with the ETA program. I understand most of the countries do not have accommodations for individuals with dependents, but some of them do, and even provide a stipend. How realistic is it for me to apply (I’m very passionate, and hold all of the qualities) however, I cannot seem to find any information about single mothers with young children applying for the Fulbright.

    • Hi Sandy,

      I don’t see why having a dependent would affect your application. As far as $$$ goes, they don’t give you much but I’m sure that if you got the grant you could find other sources of funding, grants/friends and family etc.

      Brett

  7. Hello Brett,

    Very valuable information, thank you. I was wondering if you knew of any scholarship/grant programs that are similar to Fulbright. I am attending graduate school in Switzerland in the Spring semester and, hence, no longer eligible for Fulbright. Thanks again.

    Jean

  8. Hello am JB from Uganda and i would like to know which month of the year does one apply for a fellowship and how can one be connected to a University in USA?

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